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Tuesday, May 29 2018

By Angelos Angelou, CEO, Angelou Economics

For those so inclined, a quick glance at any scientific journal or publication reveals a community of discovery that is exciting, complicated, and, frankly speaking, bizarre. Recent breakthroughs include, but are by no means limited to: the observation of a neutron star collision that gave birth to an unfathomable amount of deep-space gold; the growing of a premature lamb in a plastic bag; and continued development of the CRISPR gene-editing technique. Researcher’s at the University of Cambridge even taught sheep to recognize Emma Watson’s face.  


Source: The Times

Alright, so all of that is…interesting. But it also raises an important question: why? What’s the point? How do we get from a celebrity-enamored sheep to a practical, commercialized good or service? The fact is, while discovery for discovery’s sake is great, it’s also expensive. Framing it another way, if research is to remain viable in the long-run, the knowledge gained must at some point make it out of scientists’ imaginations and into the hands of consumers. Unfortunately, the road from discovery to dollars is not always an easy one.

Posted by: Nicole@ExpansionSolutionsMagazine.com AT 03:05 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Thursday, June 01 2017

By Kate McEnroe, President of Kate McEnroe Consulting

When we hear the term research park, the automatic tendency is to think of our largest private and state institutions, those that receive major research grants.

It has now become almost the standard for major universities to create parks to foster technology transfer and economic development initiatives, not to mention the benefits they bring to the university in attracting gifted faculty and students.

Just as research parks are usually associated with institutions offering four-year and graduate programs, the discussions about the need for an increase in the STEM workforce also tends to focus on boosting the number of individuals with bachelors, masters, or doctorate degrees.

Posted by: Nicole@ExpansionSolutionsMagazine.com AT 07:58 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Thursday, January 14 2016

By Catherine Searle Renault, principal and owner of Innovation Policyworks, LLC

When the grandfather of university research parks, the Research Triangle Park (RTP) near Raleigh, NC, is making major changes, you know something is afoot. After nearly 50 years, RTP is changing its approach, modifying its suburban campus’ auto-accessible layout to include a centralized “downtown.” Adding a new 400 acre new development will make RTP more like a city: stores, restaurants, condos and apartments "for a variety of incomes"—and of course, tech companies.

The motivation for this change is the rise of innovation districts across the country that are offering a new vision where anchor institutions like universities, large and small companies and the resources of the broader ecosystem co-exist to produce economic vitality and growth. And, these innovation districts are largely thriving in large metropolitan areas, challenging the suburban office park model.

What’s driving innovation districts? Millennials and Baby Boomers. The demographic shift, driven by aging Baby Boomers and Millennials, is causing population growth in metro areas after decades of flight to the suburbs.  Both older workers and the youngest workers want to live, work and play in the same place, have lower car ownership levels and value an environmentally-friendly, low carbon footprint lifestyle.

Posted by: Nicole@ExpansionSolutionsMagazine.com AT 09:10 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
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